How new insights into stress can help calm the worried mind

Posted Posted in Coping, Social Support, Stress

Bart Verkuil, Department of Clinical Psychology, Leiden University, The Netherlands and PEP Group, Noordwijk, The Netherlands.

“What if I get infected and end up in the hospital?” “What if I can’t pay my bills in a few months?” “What effect will this lockdown have on my children’s the health?”

The threat of the coronavirus is having a huge impact on most of our lives. To determine what measures need to be taken and to estimate what risks we are facing, scientists use statistical models to gain insight into the spread of the virus. This surely helps to gain some control over this pandemic. Interestingly, we as individual human beings are continuously acting like these scientists, but in a more automatic manner; our human minds can be thought of as ‘prediction machines’, constantly estimating whether we are currently at risk of getting infected, losing our jobs or being criticized. Yet, there are large differences in how people estimate these risks and for some people these estimations spiral down to intense worries.

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If medicine is a team game, patients should play too: a psychological perspective on patient engagement

Posted Posted in Patient engagement

By G. Graffigna, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Healthcare professionals along the whole care journey must collaborate and coordinate their efforts for healthcare systems to function effectively. In other words, medicine requires teamwork to be successful. If we agree on this principle, then –adopting a sports metaphor –the patient too should be considered a player in the team!

The concept of patient engagement recognizes this, and it is an important ingredient for enhancing the effectiveness and sustainability of healthcare.

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How to support patients to lose weight and better manage their type 2 diabetes

Posted Posted in Communication, Incentives, Motivational interviewing, Social Support

By Leah Avery, Teesside University, UK.

Type 2 diabetes was previously considered a progressive condition, with an inevitable need for insulin therapy, however lifestyle behavioural change research challenges this pessimistic prognosis. As prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to increase, so does evidence supporting the important role of the food and changing what we eat to successfully manage the condition.

Dietary approaches can largely be divided into two. Those that focus on what we eat (e.g., carbohydrates) to optimise metabolism and glycaemic control via slow and steady weight loss. Others that focus on the amount eaten, such as the low-calorie diet involving significant energy restriction for rapid weight loss.

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Teaching practitioners Healthy Conversation Skills 

Posted Posted in Communication, Goal setting

By Wendy Lawrence, University of Southampton

The main causes of death and disease in society today are influenced by our lifestyle choices, and there is a growing focus on ways to improve health behaviours. Front-line practitioners, particularly those working in health, social and community care roles, are a key resource for supporting behavioural change. Routine appointments offer opportunities to initiate conversations about behaviour change every week, but many practitioners feel that they lack the knowledge and skills necessary to provide behaviour change support. This can reduce our confidence for having conversations with clients or patients about potentially sensitive topics, including smoking, weight loss or alcohol intake.

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To eat or not to eat, that is the question: How can health psychology practitioners help people manage food safety?

Posted Posted in Automaticity, Habit, Self-efficacy

By Barbara Mullan, Curtin University, Australia

Extent of the problem

Every year, one in 10 people worldwide (approximately 600 million people) become ill after eating contaminated food, and as many as 420,000 people die. There are vast geographical differences in where these instances occur, with African, South-East Asian, and Eastern Mediterranean regions bearing the highest burden of foodborne disease (further detail about the foodborne disease burden by region can be found here). In addition to these geographical differences, there are also vast differences in the types of agents that are responsible for foodborne disease (e.g., viruses, bacteria, parasites).

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Helping pregnant women quit smoking: sharing best practice from the UK

Posted Posted in Financial Incentives, Smoking cessation

By Felix Naughton, University of East Anglia, UK

 Between 25-50% of female smokers quit smoking after they discover they are pregnant. But why do the remainder continue to smoke throughout their pregnancy?

 Do they not know that smoking during pregnancy is harmful? They usually do. One of our UK studies, that included pregnant women both motivated and unmotivated to quit, found 99% agreed to some degree with the statement ‘smoking during pregnancy can cause serious harm to my baby’ with around 75% agreeing very much or extremely. Yet less than 10% of them were abstinent 12 weeks later. While making a quit attempt is more likely among those with strong ‘harm beliefs’ about smoking in pregnancy, it does not appear to increase the chances of success. 

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Improving the delivery of brief alcohol advice in primary care: views from both sides of the consultation table

Posted Posted in Assessment, Brief behavioural intervention, Goal setting, Habit, Planning

By Amy O’Donnell, Newcastle University, UK

Levels of drinking have fallen recently in some parts of Europe, particularly amongst young people. However, excessive alcohol consumption remains a major risk factor for poor health and early death. Providing simple brief advice to those identified as heavy drinkers can help reduce the amount of alcohol people consume, especially when delivered by primary care clinicians such as general practitioners (GPs) or nurses. Alcohol brief advice involves a short, evidence-based, structured conversation that aims to motivate and support a patient to consider a change in their drinking behaviour to reduce their risk of harm. We still haven’t fully identified the key ingredients of these conversations, but providing personalised feedback on a patient’s alcohol consumption, and encouraging them to self-monitor their drinking, seem to be particularly effective parts of the package.

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Staying well while staying at home

Posted Posted in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Coping, Habit, Mental Health, Planning, Routines, Self-monitoring, SMART Goals

By Dr Federica Picariello and Professor Rona Moss-Morris, King’s College London, the UK.

Within weeks around the world, daily life dramatically changed, and uncertainty seized our future in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Beyond the immediate and urgent need to slow down the spread of COVID-19 through rapid and widespread behavioural change (i.e., self-isolation, social distancing, and quarantine), the impact on mental and physical wellbeing needs to be considered to allow early intervention and mitigate the longer-term consequences.

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How to maintain health behaviours long term?

Posted Posted in Habit, Motivation, Self-monitoring, Self-regulation

By Dominika Kwasnicka, SWPS University, Poland and University of Melbourne, Australia

The ultimate goal of health promotion programmes is to promote long-lasting change and health care professionals can play a role and help patients to improve their health outcomes and maintaining behaviour change. We know that health behaviour change is difficult to initiate and it can be even more challenging to maintain in the long term. One big question in health psychology is why maintenance is so difficult. 

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Sluta vara en struts! Fördelarna med att hjälpa människor övervaka sina framsteg

Posted Posted in Self-monitoring

Av: Thomas L. Webb, Department of Psychology, The University of Sheffield, the UK

Hur går det med ditt mål, att minska din sockerkonsumtion och tappa 10 kg? Antagligen vet du inte – du kanske inte ens vill veta. I situationer som dessa tenderar vi människor att bete oss som strutsar och begrava våra huvuden i sanden, undvikandes eller avvisandes information som skulle hjälpa oss att övervaka våra målframsteg. Forskning om detta ”strutsproblem ” tyder på att vi ofta inte håller reda på våra framsteg (t.ex. genom att väga oss) till viss del för att sådan framstegsövervakning får oss att må dåligt över vår nuvarande status – vi väger mer än vi hoppats och vi äter fortfarande för mycket socker. Teori och forskning tyder dock på att framstegsövervakning hjälper oss människor att identifiera skillnaden mellan vårt nuvarande och önskade tillstånd, och att skillnaden kan motivera oss att handla. Genom att undvika framstegsövervakning gör vi det svårare att identifiera behovet av att agera och svårare att upptäcka vilka handlingar som har bäst effekt. Att förstå ”strutsproblemet” gör det därför möjligt för sjukvårdspersonal (och andra) att hjälpa människor att framstegsövervaka. Vi har hittat starka bevis på att när vi stödjer människors framstegsövervakning hjälper detta dem att uppnå mål inom en rad domäner.

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